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Archive for Natural Health Regimens

Diet and Nutrition

Proper diet and good nutrition have become matters of concern for many in recent years. Diet and nutrition demonstrate how modern science and traditional wisdom can come together to provide practical answers to the issues that surround nutrition, so that one is brought into greater harmony with the environment and into closer touch with the inner self.

By the time we reach the month of January we have embraced traditional foods and drinks and they many have been high in sugar and calories and may be in excess of fat, so what should we do now? We can start to incorporate foods in our diet that are high in fiber, such as beans, nuts, oatmeal and fruits such as apples, berries and pears. You can also include a fiber supplement on those days that you do not have ready access to fruit or nuts.

Most of us have thought about New Year’s resolutions. Let’s start with a healthy one; tips for eating healthy and well.

  • Base your meals on higher fiber.
  • Eats lots of fruits and vegetables.
  • Eat more fish.
  • Cut down on saturated fats and sugars.
  • GET ACTIVE AND OBTAIN A HEALTHY WEIGHT.
  • Drink plenty of water.

Don’t make your resolutions too complicated. Start small and “keep it simple.” Making big promises right off the bat is just setting yourself up for failure — start small and finish big!

“How about them apples?” “It seems the old adage of an apple a day was nearly right,” Professor Julie Lonegrave said of the findings after eating two apples a day for eight weeks. Participants decreased their risk of suffering from a heart attack and lowered their blood sugar and their LDL cholesterol, which is known as bad cholesterol. Lonegrave and her team noted, “For a start, two apples (any kind of apple so long as they are on the larger side) provides about 25% of someone’s daily fiber which strengthens gut bacteria and is also linked to cholesterol reduction. Apples are easy to eat and make great snack foods.”

So, let’s put on our New Year’s resolution seat belt and ride into a healthy sunset.

Your Wellness Friend: Shirley Golden, Staff ND, The Health Patch – Cultivating Naturopathic Care for Total Health Email: jehovah316@netzero.net.

For more information, contact Naturopathic Dr. Randy Lee, owner of The Health Patch at 1024 S. Douglas Blvd., Midwest City, at 405-736-1030 or email pawpaw@TheHealthPatch.com or visit http://TheHealthPatch.com.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

The Digestive System: Root of Good Health

Our digestive system has many functions similar to how roots function in plants. They both absorb nutrients and water. If we are not properly absorbing the nutrients we need, this can lead to a host of issues. If fact, up to 50% of health ailments we suffer from can be rooted in poor digestive health; making the digestive system the root of good health when absorbing and functioning well and the root of poor health when it is not.

Toxins in foods, medications, environmental toxins and stress can all be culprits that can disrupt proper digestion and lead to irritation in the digestive tract that can cause such symptoms as bloating, indigestion, acid reflux, diarrhea and constipation. It’s not just these symptoms we need to be concerned about either. Up to 70% of immune tissue is found in and around the digestive tract and up to 90% of serotonin receptors are found in the gut; making gut health imperative to a healthy immune function and healthy mood.

So, how can we keep a healthy and happy digestive system?

Diet The most important step for a healthy digestive system is to look at what we are ingesting. Processed foods and allergens can create a world of havoc on digestion. Common food allergens are wheat, dairy and corn. Of course, there can be many other offending foods, but these are very good places to begin omitting foods that can cause gut irritation. Committing to healing foods like the Paleo diet can go a long way in healing the digestive tract.

Enzymes We have often heard the saying “We are what we eat.” In actuality, we are what we digest. We can eat very nutritiously, but if we are not breaking down and assimilating foods well, we will not benefit with nourishment needed for energy and good health. Enzymes are protein structures that have the ability to combine substances or to take them apart and regulate numerous body functions. They are typically found in raw foods. Because it is difficult to eat a 100% raw diet, supplementing with a plant-based enzyme supplement is important for good digestion.

Probiotics Good intestinal biofilm is crucial for good health. These biofilms act as a protective barrier against toxins and aids in assimilating nutrients. Biofilm is created by good bacteria in the gut. Once again, poor diets, stress and antibiotic use are destroyers of this good gut flora. Supplementing with a good probiotic as well as eating cultured vegetables and yogurt can help restore the intestinal biofilm.

Stress The big “S” word. Seems like we just can’t strive for good health without dealing with stress. As mentioned above, stress depletes the body of good gut flora, creating a poor foundation for health, and it also decreases our bodies ability to digest properly. Digestion works best when we are relaxed; making it important, as much as possible, to eat our meals in a low stress environment. That means avoiding eating while driving. Eating with family during the holidays might count as stressful, but we have an herb for that!
We here at The Health Patch are happy to help you find the best supplements for better digestion and a happy digestive system.

Health and Blessings,
Kimberly Anderson, ND

For more information, contact Naturopathic Doctor Randy Lee, owner of The Health Patch at 1024 S. Douglas Blvd., Midwest City, at 405-736-1030 or email pawpaw@TheHealthPatch.com or visit http://TheHealthPatch.com.

2020 Cleansing Regimen-The Colon

Several years ago, I learned the health value of cleansing. None of us want to think that we are keeping waste and toxins in our bodies. But the fast-paced life we have come to accept as “normal” and the unusual sleep regimens most of us practice aren’t conducive with good health. God could have made us without the need to sleep. But when we are awake, WE direct our bodies to do what we want them to accomplish. When we sleep our subconscious takes over and the body cleanses itself.

So, to aid in this cleansing process I have adopted a year-long regimen of cleansing which aids in cleansing different body systems by month. I’m calling 2020 “The Year of the Cleanse.” This program is to respond to several of my customers who have asked what cleansing I do and when do I do it. It is not “scientific”, but it has kept me feeling very good for a number of years now. I’m now 74 years old, and with my doctor’s confirmation, I have very few restriction on what I can do. Now, I don’t function like a teenager, but I can do most everything other healthy people my age can, and I sleep well, I eat well, I have a good social life and I still work full time (and enjoy it!

January – NSP’s Clean Start I confess to not eating well between Thanksgiving and Christmas (even up to the New Year when one of my resolutions is always to eat better!) So I always start the New Year with a Nature’s Sunshine “Clean Start.” This packaged product is labeled as a “Dietary Cleansing and Detoxifying Program”, comes in a couple of different flavors, and is a two-week program of both packets of capsules and powdered drink mixes. It “supports the natural, everyday cleansing of waste from the body, moves intestinal contents through the digestive system and helps maintain natural energy levels.”

It contains fiber ingredients like psyllium hulls, soothing mucilage like aloe vera, and the ever-popular chlorophyll. It also has herbs for cleaning the lower bowel – like cascara sagrada bark, licorice root, capsicum, ginger, Oregon grape, red clover and turkey rhubarb. And it contains things that we use for cleaning environmental toxins; like burdock dandelion, fenugreek, pepsin, yellow dock, milk thistle, echinacea and other probiotics.

It does an excellent job of deep-cleaning the colon. We start with the colon because obviously if it is blocked or toxic, other areas may have trouble being cleansed. It’s a great start for the new year. I do one two-week box every January. It really is a “Clean Start.”

We have in the store a number of products from a number of companies that you could use in place of this specific product. They run from single-bottle products, to 3 to 5-day programs, to one-week programs, etc. We even have one that takes 30-days for those who feel severely toxic.

If you’d like a copy of my personal annual cleansing regimen, just contact us by phone, email, or through our website and I’ll be happy to mail you a copy.

For more information, contact Naturopathic Doctor Randy Lee, owner of The Health Patch at 1024 S. Douglas Blvd., Midwest City, at 405-736-1030 or email pawpaw@TheHealthPatch.com or visit http://TheHealthPatch.com.

Historical and ‘Folk’ Methods and Remedies for Sleep

The Bed Chamber:
One-third of your life is passed in sleep. This period of unconsciousness and rest is necessary for the renewal of vital strength, and much of the health depends upon its proper management. Thus, you must look into the sleeping area as a whole.

Throughout the ages, there was considerable doubt as to which was a healthier sleeping arrangement: separate rooms, same room but separate beds, or a single room with one bed. It has been deemed that when both parties are in good health, and of nearly the same age, one chamber, if sufficiently roomy, may be used without any disadvantage to either. Such an arrangement is also to be commended, because it secures closer companionship, and thus develops and sustains mutual affection.

There are conditions under which sleeping together is prejudicial to the health. A certain amount of fresh air during the night is required by everyone. Re-breathed air is poisonous. During sleep constant exhalations take place from the lungs and from the skin, which are injurious if absorbed. A room twelve feet square is too small for two adults, unless it is so thoroughly ventilated that there is a constant change of air. In fact, a couple’s bedroom should contain an air-space of at least twenty-four hundred cubic feet, and the facilities for ventilation should be such that the whole amount will be changed in an hour; that is, at the rate of forty cubic feet per minute for it has been ascertained that twenty cubic feet of fresh air a minute are required for every healthy adult.

The very young and very old people should never occupy the same sleeping area. This also applies with couples who are 40+ years apart in age. The reason behind this is the different breathing rates. The normal respiratory rate for healthy adults is between 12 and 20 breaths per minute. At this breathing rate, the carbon dioxide exits the lungs at the same rate that the body produces it. Breathing rates of below 12 or above 20 can mean a disruption in normal breathing processes. Normal respiratory rates for children in breaths per minute are as follows: birth to 1 year: 30-60; 1 to 3 years: 24-40; 3 to 6 years: 22-34; 6 to 12 years: 18-30; 12 to 18 years: 12-16.

To determine whether a person’s respiratory rate is normal, it is essential to measure it at rest. (Remember, exercise or even walking across a room can affect a person’s respiratory rate.) To take an accurate measurement, watch the person’s chest rise and fall. One complete breath comprises one inhalation, when the chest rises, followed by one exhalation, when the chest falls. To measure the respiratory rate, count the number of breaths for an entire minute or count for 30 seconds and multiply that number by two. However, if one suffers from obstructive sleep apnea a blockage of the airway often due to relaxation of the soft tissues in the throat causes brief pauses in breathing and may decrease overall respiratory rate.

Certain diseases can be spread by sleeping together. The bed of a consumptive patient is a powerful source of contagion. Tubercular disease has been known to be transferred from men to animals by inoculation. Cases were recorded in the 19th century of young robust girls of healthy parentage, marrying men affected with consumption, acquiring the disease in a short time, and dying, in some instances, before their husbands. In these significant cases, the sickly emanations have apparently been communicated during sleep. When, therefore, either husband or wife is known to have consumption, it would be highly imprudent for them to pass the long hours of the night either in the same bed or in the same room. But, this can include many other ailments-from the common cold to the plague.

Excessive clothing at night can be highly injurious; so are fires in the bedroom, except in case of sickness. If the body becomes over-heated during sleep, perspiration occurs, or the action of the heart is increased, and the whole system becomes agitated. Either condition prevents sound sleep and reinvigoration of the body.

Another topic of debate throughout the ages involved the proper position for sleeping. Ancient Egyptians slept on beds that slanted downwards to a foot board. At the head of the beds was a headrest consisting of a semicircular upper piece supported by columns affixed to a woven mat base. The base of one’s skull rested on these headrests.

In a work from 1642 the Swedish royal physician, Andreas Sparman, recommends that people should sleep in a sitting position because otherwise fluids from the stomach could somehow leak out and lead to a scenario where “hufvudet fyls medh Öfverflöd” (“the head is filled with overflow”). A common myth is: a common use of a shorter bed “forced” people to sleep half-sitting up. In fact, most antique beds are larger than most of our modern ones.

Mattresses made of animal hides and furs were the choice of Native Americans. Another common bed-filling was straw. Leaves were considered a good mattress-filler, while reeds, bracken or seaweed were suitable choices in some regions. The Roman writer Pliny reported that spartum or esparto grass was used in Spain 2000 years ago, and this continued into the
19th century. Chaff (husks separated from edible grains, and sometimes mixed with chopped straw since the invention of mechanical “chaff-cutters”) is softer but not available in such quantities. Rice chaff has filled mattresses in Asia; oat chaff was traditional for Scottish chaff-beds or cauf-secks (sacks). Using a straw mattress under a softer woolen or feather one was quite common by the 19th century, but it was a luxury in the 15th. However, feather beds are not conducive to good health. Mattresses made of wool, or of wool and horsehair, are much better.

Bed fillings can be placed on the bare ground/floor in a loose heap or it can be put into a wooden bed with sides. One can also tie it into a mattress shape and cover it with a simple sack, called a tick. Travelers often carried empty ticks to be filled with whatever was available when they bedded down for the night.

Beds long saturated with the night exhalations of their occupants are not wholesome. Replacing the bed filling was a seasonal chore, usually undertaken around harvest time. No matter what the filling choice is the bed should be opened, and its contents-including the pillows and blankets-exposed to the air and sunlight, once every year. This aided in the sanitation of the items. Native Americans often placed the bedding material over ant hills for the removal of other unpleasant, disease carrying insects.

The Sleep Pattern:
Today modern humans are chronically sleep-deprived, which may be why we usually take only 15 minutes to fall asleep, and why we try our best not to wake up in the night. People seem to regard 7 to 8 hours of unbroken sleep as the norm. Anything less means that something is awry-insomnia.

More than one-third of American adults these days wake up in the middle of the night on a regular basis. Of those who experience “nocturnal awakenings,” nearly half are unable to fall back asleep right away. Doctors frequently diagnose this condition as a sleep disorder called “middle-of-the-night insomnia,” and prescribe medication to treat it.

Historical evidence suggests that nocturnal awakenings aren’t abnormal at all; they are the natural rhythm one’s body gravitates toward. It is the compressed, continuous eight-hour sleep routine to which everyone aspires today that is unprecedented in human history. We’ve been sleeping all wrong lately — so if one has “insomnia,” one may actually be doing things right.

The dominant pattern of sleep since time immemorial was segmented or biphasic. Biphasic sleep patterns evolved to fill the long stretch of nighttime, and as observed by anthropologists, segmented sleep continues to be the norm for many people in undeveloped parts of the world, such as the Tiv group in Central Nigeria. Everyone sleeps biphasically when subjected to natural patterns of light and dark. In biphasic sleep, humans sleep in two four-hour blocks, which were separated by a period of wakefulness in the middle of the night lasting an hour or more. Most stay in their beds and bedrooms, sometimes reading, and often they would use the time to pray. (Religious manuals used to include special prayers to be said in the mid-sleep hours.) During these waking times people also would get up and do household tasks, such as preparing the morning meal or they even visit with the neighbors before returning to their beds. There were night jobs to aid in the safety of those who travel away from their homes during these hours-night watchman and the town crier are two main ones. Candles were used most during these hours of the night.

From pre-Industrial European times to the 19th century sleep referred to as “first sleep” or “deep sleep” started at sunset and ended around midnight and “second sleep” or “morning sleep” started at around 2 am and lasted until sunrise. (The times depended on the sun’s cycle. During winter, darkness spanned up to 14 hours each night.) Thomas Edison’s light bulb was a major factor in the shift of how we currently sleep.

In places with electricity, though, artificial lighting has prolonged our experience of daylight, allowing us to be productive for longer. At the same time, it has cut nighttime short, and so to get enough sleep we now have to do it all in one go. Now, “normal” sleep requires forgoing the periods of wakefulness that used to break up the night; we simply don’t have time for a midnight chat with the neighbor any longer. But people with particularly strong circadian rhythms continue to wake up in the night.

Traditional patterns show people normally awaken from REM sleep, which is the deep sleep stage during which dreams occur, which affords people a pathway to their subconscious. Now-a-days, with morning dreams one doesn’t have the opportunity to let their dreams settle. The light goes on and one gets out of bed immediately. Society has lost what people in the past regarded as a critically important part of their lives – their dream life.

Remedies-The Unproven and the Proven:

  • Gerolamo Cardano (1501-1576), a doctor and mathematician in Renaissance Italy stated sleep could be attained by rubbing some canine ear wax across your pearly whites.
  • A medieval European one-drinking a potion containing the bile of a castrated boar before bed. A Japanese one-sea slug entrails eaten at bedtime aids insomnia. Entrails are considered a delicacy in Japan which they extract, salt, and cure.
  • A bath before bed can also help one wind down physically. The body temperature naturally dips about two hours before one goes to sleep, but the rapid cool-down period that happens after soaking in a hot tub should immediately make you feel relaxed and sleepy.
  • In Elizabethan England rubbing the feet with dormouse fat was thought to be an effective insomnia cure. Another name for the dormouse is the sleep mouse, and in French the equivalent phrase for sleeping like a log is ‘to sleep like a dormouse.’
  • According to the 1898 edition of the Glasgow Herald offered this advice to insomniacs: “Soap your hair with ordinary yellow soap; rub it into the roots of the brain until it is lathered all over; tie it up in a napkin, go to bed, and wash it out in the morning. Do this for a fortnight. Take no tea after 6 p.m.”
  • To hang a flint with a hole in it over the head of one’s bed is a preservative against the nightmare.
  • Before going to bed, place your shoes carefully by the bedside coming and going; that is with the heel of one pointing in the direction of the toe of the other and then you will be sure to sleep quietly and well.
  • Wear socks to bed. The additional layer on one’s feet can help improve circulation in extremities, which should speed up the process of falling asleep.
  • Eating fried lettuce was a French folk remedy for insomnia. The ancient Egyptians believed in consuming lactucarium or “lettuce opium,” a milky substance secreted from certain varieties of lettuce greens. However, today lettuce opium is known mainly for its psychotropic effects.
  • Eating onions before bed was once thought to be a sleep aid. Today, it is known that they can also mess with one’s metabolism and health.
  • Charles Dickens believed pointing his bed northward was the best cure for his own insomnia.
  • You can’t forget about counting sheep. Do you fall asleep through hypnotism or through boredom? Mental imagery can help distract you from thinking the kind of stressful and anxious thoughts that keep you up at night.
  • Don’t eat cheese before bed. Scientific theories suggest that the bacterial and fungal elements of cheese might actually be to blame for weird post-sleep brain activity.
  • Toe curls is a form of progressive muscle relaxation, which involves deliberately tensing and relaxing certain muscle groups. There is evidence that this does help promote the relaxation, especially when combined with taking a deep breath between tensing and relaxing the relevant muscles.
  • Cinnamon balances blood sugar levels so your hormones can function in a way that allows for better sleep.
  • Bananas, especially the peel, contain magnesium which promotes muscle relaxation and stress relief.
  • A glass of warm milk also contains magnesium and a trace amounts of the amino acid, l-tryptophan. A popular night drink is: 1 cup milk; 1 teaspoon honey; 2 drops vanilla extract; 1 pinch ground cinnamon. Cook on stove until the milk is very hot and begins to foam, about 3 minutes. Stir in honey and vanilla, then sprinkle with cinnamon before serving.

Jolene Griffiths, Staff ND, The Health Patch
Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ

The Health Patch 1024 S. Douglas Blvd., Midwest City, OK 73130 Ph: 405-736-1030

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Three H’s for a Good Night’s Sleep

For productivity and health, it is important to get a good night’s sleep. Today we will discuss 3 H’s that can help obtain better sleep:

  • Hygiene
  • Hydration
  • Herbs

Hygiene Sleep Hygiene is the simply the habits or practices for good sleep. Here are a few practices to incorporate:

  • Put down the phone. Today’s technology helps keep us connected, informed, and productive, but using phones and other devices before bed can interfere with our bodies normal, healthy, hormone cycle for sleep. At least an hour before bed, put away all devices and begin other routines for bedtime.
  • Keep your bedroom cool and dark. Darkness will trigger the Pineal Gland that it is time for sleep, releasing the sleep hormone Melatonin.
  • Have a regular time to go to bed and get up the following morning.

Hydration
Dehydration can contribute to anxiety, making it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep. Stay hydrated throughout the day by drinking ½ oz. of water per pound of body weight. Be sure to drink early enough in the day to avoid the need to eliminate during the night.

Herbs
Two types of herbs that can be beneficial for restful sleep are Nervines and Adaptogens. Nervines are herbs that have actions on the nervous system. Relaxing Nervines help to activate the parasympathetic nervous system that is responsible for our “rest and digest” state among other actions, and to calm the sympathetic system which has the general action to mobilize the body’s resources under stress by inducing the flight or flight response. Some great Nervines are:

  • Hops—Help relieve mental strain and worry
  • Passion Flower—Helps calm mental chatter
  • Skullcap—Soothes the nervous system
  • Valerian—calming

Adaptogens are also beneficial for restful sleep due to their ability to reduce the output of stress hormones by affecting the hypothalamus/pituitary/ adrenal or HPA axis in the glandular system. These actions help to mediate the stress response and helps the body maintain a normal function under mental, physical, or emotional stress. Some great Adaptogenic herbs are:

  • Ashwangandha—helps reduce stress and inflammation
  • Eleuthero-helps reduce stress and enhances immunity
  • Holy Basil-helps protect the heart from stress

The Health Patch – Cultivating Naturopathic Care for Total Health, 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, MWC, 736-1030, e-mail: pawpaw@thehealthpatch.com

Children’s Oral Health

Many don’t realize how connected oral health is to overall health. Early dental care prevents dental diseases. It is the first line of defense against many common dental issues, such as plaque, gum disease and cavities.

Once children start school parents have less influence over their meals and snacks during the day. Set an example for your children by eating a variety of healthy foods yourself, and by following a consistent oral health care routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing.

Encouraging children to care for their teeth can be an uphill battle. However, it is the parents’ responsibility to encourage better dental care to their children. Obviously, tooth-friendly foods such as fruits, vegetables and nuts are better for teeth than cookies, candy and chips. If you want to improve your children’s eating habits, consider tips to make the process more enjoyable for them:

  • Involve your child in buying and/or preparing healthy food for the table.
  • Have them chop carrots, wash an apple or cut cheese into cubes.
  • Have a pre-prepared healthy snack container in the refrigerator for when they are ready to look for a snack.

Here are 10 tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics top help children keep a healthy smile:

  1. Lead by example. Show them by practicing good oral health yourself.
  2. Choose a dentist that you and your children will like and trust.
  3. Take them to the dentist regularly – usually every six months – for routine cleaning and checkups.
  4. Remind them to brush before they leave for school and before bedtime.
  5. Encourage them to brush during any travel time.
  6. Teach the importance of flossing. It may help prevent gum disease.
  7. Encourage your child to eat breakfast daily. Children who eat a high protein breakfast have a noticeable reduction in cravings for sweets.
  8. If they are going to drink juices, have them use a straw. Doing so reduces their teeth’s exposure to sugar.
  9. Reduce sugar in their diet. Replace sugar snacks with healthy snacks such as fruit, carrots, cheese, crackers and water.
  10. Reward healthy habits. Leave little treats from the “tooth fairy” to reward your child for practicing good oral health.

Poor oral health can profoundly affect a child’s health and well-being. It can cause difficulty in chewing, and may cause them not to eat enough, which would cause them to be lacking in the nutrients required for healthy growth and development.

Your wellness friend, Shirley Golden!

Shirley Golden, Staff ND, The Health Patch – Cultivating Naturopathic Care for Total Health
1024 S. Douglas Blvd, MWC, ph:736-1030, e-mail: jehovah316@netzero.net.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is intended for
educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Using Technology for Better Health

We live in a time of great technology, and while it can be very beneficial for our physical, mental, and emotional well-being to “unplug” and put our many electronic devices aside for a time, using technology to gain better understanding of our health needs has never been better.

Here at The Healthpatch, we have many customers that request products that they have recently read or heard about. While the products in question may be of excellent quality and have proven beneficial for many people, the question remains: Is it right for you?

Each person has their own unique biological coherence, making it important to choose and use the correct supplements. We offer health assessment tools called biocommunication scans. One such scan used at The HealthPatch is the Quantum Resonance Magnetic Analyzer. I personally use the Zyto scans with my clients. Both types of scan use a simple and painless process during which a person’s hand is placed on a cradle and then subtle energetic impulses are introduced into the body. Software then records each response. This type of assessment helps remove any communication barriers, making it particularly helpful for children.

A BioScan can also help give insight into personal wellness that may have gone unnoticed. The emotional areas of health are where I see this information particularly helpful.

Regular scans can also help focus on particular areas, track your wellness program, and help save money by eliminating guesswork and utilizing supplements specific to individual needs.

If you are interested in getting your personalized health assessment, contact me at The Health Patch 405-736-1030.

Health and Blessings,
Kimberly Anderson, ND

The Health Patch 1024 S. Douglas Blvd. Midwest City, OK 73130 405-736-1030

What are the Benefits of Full Body Massage?

Massage involves the rubbing and manipulating of muscles, tendons, skin and ligaments. In medical settings, such as clinics and hospitals, chiropractors and many others are doing full body massages. There are around 88 different kinds of massages that can be performed on a person.


It is important that your minerals and vitamins are intact before getting a massage. A person having sciatica on the left side of the body might be low on sodium, whereas a person that is having trouble on the right side of the body might be low on potassium. I have found that runners that have just run a marathon will come in and say they are really hurting after they had just run the marathon. Also, we see a lot of issues with the general public this time of the year due to the hotter weather and people perspiring more. If they don’t replace the sodium when they sweat, then their bodies could start showing signs of low sodium such as cramping or having sciatica problems. I prefer the pink salt known as Himalayan salt. Himalayan Salt has around 84 minerals in it, which can be beneficial for our bodies. You can get it at most stores. https://www.thehealthpatch.com carries it also.

At Integrity health spa we like to call our Swedish massage “Therapeutic Massage”. We critique the massage to the individual. A full body massage offers multiple benefits, both physically and psychologically. Consult a physician if you have any of these medical conditions before getting a massage: cancer, fractures, blood clots, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis or if you are pregnant.

We use essential oils and Magnesium oils and we use Lab certified 100% THC free CBD oils.

At Integrity Health Spa we have Therapists to meet every bodies needs from light touch to extreme deep tissue. We have therapist that are certified in cupping among other things. You can visit our website for additional services @ Integrityhealthspa.com or call 405-455-5454.

Integrity Health Spa
Dr. Pamela Matherly
14453 S.E. 29th Street Suite A/C
Choctaw, Oklahoma 73020
405-455-5454

Intro to Reflexology

Reflexology is a type of massage that involves applying different amounts of pressure to the feet, hands, and ears. It is based on a theory that these body parts are connected to certain organs and body systems. People who practice this technology are called Reflexologists.

There are “main circuits” to every organ, gland, and nerve, and these circuits have pressure points in your hands, feet and other parts of your body. By massaging or “working” these pressure points, you not only stop pain, but you also send a healing force to all parts of the body. When these life lines are closed or clogged, malfunctioning glands and organs will make you ill.

Through reflex massage, you will be able to eliminate the causes and symptoms of sickness and pain from virtually every part of the body. The powerful healing forces of reflexology will bring you renewed vitality and health, and eliminate some illness and pain from your life.

No one should depend completely on reflexology as a “cure all”. However, it is an effective alternative method for treating many symptoms and alleviating some pain.

A person is a structural, chemical and spiritual being, and reflex massage will assist in bringing these three elements into balance.

Reflexology is truly “magic”, but you don’t need a magician to make it work for you. The power is in the hands of the reflexologist. Call The Health Patch and we will refer you to someone to help alleviate pain and illness from your life, and from the lives of those you love.

Your Wellness Friend:
Shirley Golden, Staff ND, The Health Patch – Cultivating Naturopathic Care for Total Health e-mail: jehovah316@netzero.net.

The Health Patch
1024 S. Douglas Blvd, Midwest City, PH:736-1030, http://www.thehealthpatch.com

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Age-Defying Bodywork

We talk a lot about medicine, supplements, and the latest fad health programs, but you may not be aware of simple “bodyworks” that help us to slow down the aging process. They are simple ways to mark the day-to-day small changes in our bodies and alleviate simple stresses, helping us age more gracefully and with less pain and aggravation. Let’s look at just a few!

Have you ever had anyone look into your eyes and explain that they can tell you about internal stresses in your body? If so, they were probably practicing a science known as iridology. Iridology is a non-invasive, safe and painless diagnostic technique. The irises of your eyes contain a unique pattern in the delicate fibers. This pattern is mapped into areas representing all the organs, glands and functions of the body. By determining exactly where a particular marking lies, an “iridologist” may gain insight into a potential health problem.

Most of us think of the foot as being relatively unimportant – until we stub a toe! At that moment all the energies of the rest of the body are concentrated toward that hurting member. So it is with our feet. Over a century ago, the feet were “charted”. It was noted that the feet were particularly sensitive in spots that directly related to areas of distress in the body. A chart was created that linked areas of the feet to specific portions of the body. Thus “reflexology” was born. In her book on Reflexology, Inge Dougans states, “The art of reflex foot massage must not be confused with basic foot massage or body massage in general. It is a specific pressure technique which works on precise reflex points on the feet, based on the premise that reflex areas on the feet correspond with all body parts. As the feet represent a microcosm of the body, all organs, glands and other body parts are laid out in a similar arrangement on the feet.”

Massage is a popular and well-known bodywork. But many of us think of it only for its relaxation and “feel good” functions. As an age-defying bodywork, it is also a healing art. It reduces the stress on worn muscles, moves lymphatic fluids and other toxins from body systems which contain no pumps, and enhances nutrient rich blood flow into areas that normal day-to-day activities may not complement.

And other age-defying bodyworks are the various magnetic arts and devices such as magnet therapy, and the use of machines like the Body Compass and the Quantum Magnetic Resistance Body Analyzer which use magnetic pulses to measure tissue resistances to help identify weaknesses within the body.

Many herb stores and health food stores have technicians on staff who use these arts and sciences. Fees for the service vary. Call and compare. As with any service, the cost will depend on many variables – how many appointments are included, the length of the appointments, the experience level of the practitioner, etc. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. If you’re looking for an alternative diagnostic tool to aid in determining your overall health, these may be for you.

For more information, contact Naturopathic Doctor Randy Lee, owner of The Health Patch at 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, Midwest City Phone 405-736-1030 or email pawpaw@TheHealthPatch.com Visit our website at TheHealthPatch.com.