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Archive for naturopathic doctor

Three H’s for a Good Night’s Sleep

For productivity and health, it is important to get a good night’s sleep. Today we will discuss 3 H’s that can help obtain better sleep:

  • Hygiene
  • Hydration
  • Herbs

Hygiene Sleep Hygiene is the simply the habits or practices for good sleep. Here are a few practices to incorporate:

  • Put down the phone. Today’s technology helps keep us connected, informed, and productive, but using phones and other devices before bed can interfere with our bodies normal, healthy, hormone cycle for sleep. At least an hour before bed, put away all devices and begin other routines for bedtime.
  • Keep your bedroom cool and dark. Darkness will trigger the Pineal Gland that it is time for sleep, releasing the sleep hormone Melatonin.
  • Have a regular time to go to bed and get up the following morning.

Hydration
Dehydration can contribute to anxiety, making it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep. Stay hydrated throughout the day by drinking ½ oz. of water per pound of body weight. Be sure to drink early enough in the day to avoid the need to eliminate during the night.

Herbs
Two types of herbs that can be beneficial for restful sleep are Nervines and Adaptogens. Nervines are herbs that have actions on the nervous system. Relaxing Nervines help to activate the parasympathetic nervous system that is responsible for our “rest and digest” state among other actions, and to calm the sympathetic system which has the general action to mobilize the body’s resources under stress by inducing the flight or flight response. Some great Nervines are:

  • Hops—Help relieve mental strain and worry
  • Passion Flower—Helps calm mental chatter
  • Skullcap—Soothes the nervous system
  • Valerian—calming

Adaptogens are also beneficial for restful sleep due to their ability to reduce the output of stress hormones by affecting the hypothalamus/pituitary/ adrenal or HPA axis in the glandular system. These actions help to mediate the stress response and helps the body maintain a normal function under mental, physical, or emotional stress. Some great Adaptogenic herbs are:

  • Ashwangandha—helps reduce stress and inflammation
  • Eleuthero-helps reduce stress and enhances immunity
  • Holy Basil-helps protect the heart from stress

The Health Patch – Cultivating Naturopathic Care for Total Health, 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, MWC, 736-1030, e-mail: pawpaw@thehealthpatch.com

When the Sandman just won’t visit!

We’ve all had those nights when, no matter what we do, we just can’t seem to fall asleep. Right? We try counting sheep; we try clearing our mind of all thoughts; we try warm milk, a hot shower, or a warm bath. Well, an occasional night of tossing and turning may be a real nuisance, but for many of us this is a regular occurrence.

Lack of sleep may have a number of causes. One is simply advancing age. The pineal gland is a small gland about the size of a pea located between the lobes of the brain. It is a “light sensitive” gland. When we find ourselves in the dark, it begins to secrete the hormone melatonin. Increased melatonin makes us feel drowsy. That’s why most of us get sleepy at night. But as we approach 50 or so, give or take a few years, the pineal gland slows its production of melatonin. For that reason, many older folks have sleep problems. If you’re in that age group, perhaps all you need is a melatonin supplement. And if you’re not in this age group, you should note that artificial lights, stimulant beverages and stress can disrupt normal body rhythms. Thus, for you too, melatonin supplements can be very useful, especially for jet lag or occasional insomnia. Most companies carry them in one and ten milligram capsules. This is also a good help if you can GO to sleep, but then can’t STAY asleep.

Often depression can hinder sleep, too. If this plagues you, perhaps you can benefit from a supplement of 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan). It is a precursor to serotonin, the “feel-good” neurotransmitter. This is a metabolized form of l-tryptophan that the body can use directly to make serotonin, the neurotransmitter which plays a role in mood, hunger and sleep. One source states “Increased levels of serotonin may improve symptoms of depression and anxiety and may be required for improved mood, weight-loss success and better sleep.” Check with you doctor before taking 5-HTP if you’re taking prescription medication or if you’re pregnant or nursing. And if you use it regularly, take a two-week break about every three months.

One of the primary causes of insomnia is stress. We are often so keyed-up that we just can’t seem to turn our minds off to get to sleep – especially if there are important things planned for tomorrow. In this case there are some very helpful herbs to help calm the nerves. Hops has a gentle, relaxing, sedative effect on the central nervous system. It can be taken in a capsule, enclosed in a pillow placed on your bed, or added to evening teas. Valerian root is a stronger relaxant for nervous anxiety and muscle spasms. It has a nasty odor, but cats seem to like it! So, it is best taken in capsules and is not for long-term use in large doses as it can cause depression. Passion flower is a mild sedative nervine. This is not the ornamental blue passion flower (which is poisonous), but is an entirely different plant. Its name was given in the 1500s by a Spanish doctor who was reminded of the “Passion of the Crucifixion” by the configuration of the blossom. It is much more likely to help you sleep than to generate “passion.” And Skullcap is a perennial herb in the mint family originating from North America. Skullcap has a long history of use among Native American tribes due to its soothing properties. Combinations of these are often found in “nervine sedative” sleep formulas.

We have also previously mentioned Siberian ginseng (now called Eleuthero) before as an energy producer. So, while it seems contradictory, it is also mentioned in several references to be reputed as a cure for insomnia. And most people who work with herbs know that a cup of chamomile tea is very relaxing at night.

I’ll quote two formulas for you from a book entitled “The Way of Herbs.” Both are for insomnia. “Make an infusion using equal parts of chamomile, valerian, skullcap, catnip, wood betony, and spearmint. 1) Use one ounce of herbs per pint of water. Let it steep ten minutes and drink it before going to bed. 2) For incredible dreams and for nights when you can’t allow sufficient time for sleep, make an infusion of 4 parts kava kava , 1 part alfalfa , 1 part spearmint ,1 part raspberry leaves, and 1 part lemon balm. Vary the strength according to your needs, and sweeten it with honey. The kava kava will produce a numbing effect on the tongue.”

As for minerals, ensure that your diet contains sufficient calcium and magnesium if you wish to sleep well. And foods high in l-tryptophan promote sleep. These include turkey, pumpkin seeds, bananas, figs, dates, yogurt, tuna, whole-grain crackers and nut butters. Avoid caffeine, cheese, wine, potatoes, and tomatoes in the evening.

Remember, “he grants sleep to those he loves.” Ps. 127:2b. May you enjoy the fruits of your labor and sleep like a newborn baby tonight. Enjoy good health and God’s richest blessings. Gen.1:29.

  • Randy Lee, ND, Owner, The Health Patch – Cultivating Naturopathic Care for Total Health, 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, MWC, 736-1030, e-mail: pawpaw@thehealthpatch.com

Holistic Animal Dental Care

Holistic pet care refers to focusing on the “whole” pet. Instead of focusing on specific problems, it is best to care for all aspects of your pet simultaneously. So, holistic care includes diet, exercise, grooming, shoeing, parasite control, and teeth cleanliness. Holistic pet care also refers to using natural products to care for your pet.

Most people aren’t aware that animal dental care is just as important as other types of health prevention. Tooth care should be a large portion of the happy, long life of one’s pet. In fact, it is thought that eighty-five percent of all pets have periodontal disease by age three, even if they use a raw, natural diet.

Periodontal disease is a progressive disease of the supporting tissues surrounding teeth and the main cause of early tooth loss. It starts when bacteria combine with food particles to form plaque on the teeth. Within days, minerals in the saliva bond with the plaque to form tartar, a hard substance that adheres to the teeth. The bacteria work their way under the gums and cause gingivitis-inflammation of the gums. Once under the gums, bacteria destroy the supporting tissue around the tooth, leading to tooth loss. This condition is known as periodontitis. Gingivitis and periodontitis make up the changes that are referred to as periodontal disease. With regular dental care, gingivitis is reversible. Periodontal disease is thought not to be reversible, but diligent at-home dental care and regular cleanings can slow down the progression of the condition. Let’s look at this process closer, as it also applies to humans.

Animals consume well over a trillion bacteria every day. Some of these bacteria will move down to the gastrointestinal tract, where they’ll take up residence or be excreted by the body. Others will take up residence in the mouth and colonize in the plaque. But the bacteria that enters the mouth are continuously seeding the bacterial colonies that live in the gut, and this population of bacteria is critical to their health and immune system. So, if the bacterial colonies in the mouth aren’t healthy, the bacterial colonies in the gut won’t be, and the animal as a whole won’t be either.

The bacterial colonies found in plaque are extremely organized and this speaks to their importance in the mouth. Scrapings of dental plaque reveal an organized metropolis made up of tiny, organized microscopic bacteria colonies. Collectively, these communities of bacteria and other tiny microorganisms are called a microbiome. Microbiomes are found on most body surfaces. The microbiome in the mouth is the second largest microbiome, next to the one found in the gut. The microbiome in plaque isn’t a random population of bacteria-they all live together in organized communities. Researchers have discovered that Corynebacterium is the bacteria found right next to the tooth enamel and it grows outward from the teeth, where it networks with the next layer or colony of bacteria. Corynebacterium are packed closely together and adhere closely to the tooth and this makes them hard to remove with food or brushing.

The colonies living in the outermost layer of the microbiome are mainly made up of friendly strains of Streptococcus. These bacteria releases carbon dioxide, which helps the colonies of Streptococcus to grow. These bacteria all live harmoniously with the body. In fact, bacteria and other microorganisms outnumber the amount of one’s own cells by nearly 100 to 1.

When the bacteria in the microbiome are healthy, they deliver health benefits to the host animal. This is called ‘symbiosis’ (which means the relationship between the bacteria and the host is symbiotic or beneficial to both). These bacteria manufacture short chain fatty acids and vitamins. They form the bulk of the immune system and they even have a direct connection to the brain, called the gut-brain axis. These bacteria are essential to one’s health. But, not all of the bacteria living in the body are friendly. If the colonies of bacteria are disturbed, and some species die off while others take over, their influence on the body will change. Researchers are finding that when delicate bacterial populations in microbiomes are reduced or less diverse, the risk of disease rises. A study in cats with irritable bowel disease (IBD) showed that healthy cats had a much higher bacterial population in their gut compared to cats with IBD. Another study found that the skin of healthy dogs was inhabited by a much richer and diverse bacterial population than the skin of dogs with allergies.

Research is also showing that dysbiosis in the plaque, not plaque itself, is the real cause of periodontal disease. When the bacterial populations are balanced, the immune system won’t be alarmed and activated. But, if the balance of bacteria becomes unbalanced, some unwanted species of bacteria can grow out of control and initiate an immune response. When the sulcus is inflamed, the cells in the gums will be deprived of oxygen and this lack of oxygen favors the growth of harmful bacteria. And, once their
colonies grow, they can crowd out other friendly colonies of bacteria by competing for the same nutrients and dysbiosis will occur.

If this dysbiosis isn’t repaired and balance returned to the microbiome, colonies of harmful bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis will start to destroy the tissue of the gums. Once the gums become inflamed, the immune system delivers nutrients like iron to the infected area. But, these bacteria have adapted to feed on these nutrients and they start to rapidly grow out of control while the immune system continues to feed them by pumping more and more iron and other nutrients into the infected tissue.
How much damage is done depends on a few factors. Small breed dogs and brachycephalic breeds like pugs and boxers seem to be more prone to dental disease. It’s also more likely to occur in older animals, but the immune response is critical to how quickly and how severely periodontal disease develops. Diseases like diabetes or other health issues related to a compromised immune response (like allergies, arthritis, hypothyroidism, liver, bowel and kidney disease), can ultimately cause exaggerated
inflammation in the gums and further fuel the dysbiosis. Not only can diseases in other organs have an effect on oral health, periodontal disease can cause damage in the organs as well. When the populations of some strains grow out of control, the bacteria will find it harder to compete and will migrate out of the neighborhood. Bacteria can travel from the damaged gums to the lymphatic and blood vessel systems and migrate to the body’s organs. This is called bacteremia and it’s very similar to what happens with leaky gut. In fact, the colonies of bacteria in the mouth and gut are very similar. They share 45% of the same colonies and populations. So, if the bacteria in the mouth grow out of control, that dysbiosis will seed the same dysbiosis in the gut. The toxic by-products from the harmful bacteria will also cause inflammation and erosion of the cells lining the gut wall, and more bacteria and toxins will enter the body, creating a cascade of chronic inflammation that will eventually reach the organs and cause disease there. In humans, periodontal disease has been linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, IBD and stroke. Research in dogs also shows a link to heart, liver and kidney disease.

Several causes of dysbiosis in animals include:
Antibiotics: Antibiotics kill all bacteria indiscriminately and will devastate the microbiome.
Poor Diet: A processed diet that’s high in starch or sugar can fuel unfriendly bacterial colonies. Genetically modified foods or foods with pesticides can also kill bacteria and create dysbiosis.
Drugs and Chemicals: Many drugs and chemicals will harm bacteria.
Processed Diets: Most processed pet foods are completely free of bacteria. If there isn’t a stream of bacteria entering the body, the bacterial colonies will die off, causing dysbiosis. The same applies to raw foods that have undergone high pressure pasteurization.

Dogs can develop a cavity because:
• Teeth that have abnormally formed too close together
• A low salivary pH level
• Tooth enamel that is poorly minimized
• A poor diet that is high in fermented carbohydrates
• Gaps between the teeth and the gums
• Poor hygiene/health overall.

Poor dental health signs in a dog include:
• Swollen, red, bleeding, or painful looking gums
• Recent bursts of or full-fledged depression
• Pawing at the facial or mouth area
• Bad breath that is not mistaken with “kibble breath” or from eating anything that may cause it
• A change in the chewing and/or eating habits-such as difficulty chewing, not eating certain foods
• Missing or misaligned teeth
• Discoloration, breakage, or crooked teeth that may cause issues with proper chewing
• Excessive drool; Growths or bumps within the mouth or surrounding facial area
• Brownish yellow tartar crust within or along the dog’s gum line.

Dog breeds most prone to poor dental health include Bulldog; Shih Tzu; Brussels Griffon; Chihuahua; Lhasa Apso; Pomeranian; Pug; Poodle; Terrier and Dachshund.

Ways a cat can develop a cavity include:
• Lack of in-home or in-office cleaning routinely
• Poor diet
• Chemistry, too much bacteria and rotting, within the mouth
• Injury to the tooth
• Tooth alignment issues that have trapped plaque and tartar to an advanced degree
• Association with diabetes, feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia, and other feline-related diseases
• Being a purebred breed or outcross breed that is more prone to developing diseases than others.

Typical signs of cavities or poor dental health in cats:
• Severely bad breath over a period of time
• Excessive or uncommon drooling
• Whole pieces of food in vomit or hairballs
• Pawing and scratching at the mouth
• Only eating on one side of the mouth
• Bleeding from the gums, or the mouth in general, or bloody areas around the area where a tooth meets with the gum line
• Food falling or being spit out from the mouth
• Discharge in and around the nasal area, whether it’s dry or wet
• Weight loss over a short period of time.

Cat breeds (pure breeds are at higher risk) most prone to poor dental health include Australian Mist; Burmese; Burmilla; Bombay; Cornish Rex; Devon Rex; Singapura; Sphynx; Tiffanie and Tonkinese.

Because most of the bacterial colonies are found in plaque, many veterinarians recommend brushing one’s pet’s teeth, or even a yearly veterinary dental cleaning (sometimes called a prophylaxis), where plaque and tartar are removed from a pet’s teeth, and the health of the entire mouth (tongue, gums, lips, and teeth) is assessed-all while under anesthesia. This will clear away most of the plaque, but the bacterial populations begin to colonize immediately after plaque is removed. Studies show that about a
million little organisms already cover the tooth within a minute of cleaning. And, if the populations are disrupted, harmful bacteria might take hold before the friendly populations grow and crowd them out.

Dog teeth cleaning is actually very easy to do. It’s the dogs that tend to have a problem with owners doing it; which is why it’s best to introduce the brushing of their teeth when they are a puppy so they can grow into it. However, if you’re starting a dog at an older age, ensure that they are comfortable and that you do not make the experience a traumatic one. Be patient, safe, and do a good job.

Finding a toothbrush for a pup is relatively easy. Remember that using toothpaste made for humans is extremely dangerous and should never be used on a dog. Fluoride is very toxic to animals, especially dogs, which is why there are specialty canine toothpaste available. Also, keep in mind that even some of these might contain ingredients that the dog may be allergic to.

Give the dog a good burst of exercise so they are more likely to sit or lay nicely for you. Be aware that they might make a go for the brush itself once it’s in their mouth. Start slow, brush gently, and look for signs of stress. If the dog becomes unresponsive, aggressive, agitated, or begins to cry, they are becoming too stressed out to move forward and you must stop. If you
don’t stop they will learn that when the toothbrush comes out, it’s time for them to hide, and that is the last thing you want. If this is the first time you are doing this focus on the teeth only or just below the gum line. The dog’s gums may be a little sensitive, especially if they are having certain dental problems already, and keep an eye on whether or not the gums begin to bleed. If the dog should emit a pain response for any reason, stop what you are doing and take them to a vet. Continuing could worsen whatever is going on in their mouth and that is the last thing you want.

If you don’t end up getting the entire mouth the first time around that’s perfectly fine. Breaking this type of activity in is new for the dog, considering it’s just like getting a child to get used to it, so be patient. After it’s been done a few times you can increase the amount you do it and for how long. Tell the dog how good they are being. Leave a treat that they will be able to see for after the teeth are done, and try your best to make this a positive experience.

Finding a toothbrush and toothpaste for a cat is slightly harder than for a dog. Unlike dogs, a cat is more than likely going to fight you more than a dog would do so. Getting the cat into the routine when they are as young as possible is the best way to avoid difficulty as they age, but it’s never too late to start. Start by playing with the cat and getting their energy levels down a bit. If the cat is naturally calm and relaxed you may not need to do this, but it’s best to try and get as much energy out of them as you can.

Bring the cat onto your lap, pet them into relaxation, then gently raise the lip on either side of the mouth and begin to brush the outer areas of the teeth. Brush away from the gum line to ensure that any food particles that may be embedded are pushed out and away. If this is the cat’s first time with a toothbrush, then no doubt it’s going to be a bit of a struggle. You will probably need to open the mouth more, but do not pry. Like dogs, cats need to be coaxed into home dental procedures properly and gently, and not be made to do things.

If the cat becomes stressed out, signs include being unresponsive or limp in general, for example, then they will need to be given a break before the experience becomes a traumatic one. Like a dog, if the cat becomes aggressive and tries to attack you to get away, immediately stop the brushing and consider having a vet do a regular cleaning instead. Should the cat become aggressive and you decide to keep going, you endanger yourself and the cat by pushing forward, and that is not worth the risk to the well-being of yourself and the cat. If the cat is fighting and trying to close their mouth, gently pinch the cheeks in between two of your fingers and begin to brush again. Work your way through your cat’s mouth fully, give them a treat when you’re done even if they were a nightmare to deal with. Let the cat be alone for a while if they choose to run away. After doing this a couple of times one will find that the cat will get used to it, tolerate it, absolutely hate it, or maybe even like it. Keeping a treat handy and in view will give the cat the sense that, even if they are being bad and fighting you over this, they will learn that a few minutes of enduring such a procedure will at least have some happy ending.

However, the act of brushing the teeth can cause bacteremia, especially if the gums are bleeding. The bacteria will move from the mouth to the bloodstream. In a healthy animal, the immune system can handle and clear the surge of bacteria. But, if the animal is already struggling with inflammation, dysbiosis, or other chronic disease, the immune system can reach the tipping point with brushing or cleaning because it introduces so much bacteria into the bloodstream.

Thus, dental care isn’t as simple as getting rid of plaque with brushings and regular cleanings because there are bacteria living there that keep unwanted bugs at bay. The first step in preventing or treating dental disease is to protect the microbiome from damage. Sprays and gels that contain natural properties which cleanse and coats the teeth can protect the microbiome. These include:
Grapefruit seed extract: anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-parasitic, anti-fungal
Neem oil: anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-parasitic, anti-fungal
Thyme oil (Thymus vulgaris): anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-parasitic, anti-fungal
Peppermint oil (Mentha piperita): anti-bacterial, anti-viral, sedative
Aloe Vera (used also or as a base in gels): tissue healing
Colloidal silver (used alone or as a base in sprays and gels): anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-parasitic, anti-fungal
• Grain alcohol (used as a base in many sprays)–anti-bacterial

A commonly-used maintenance schedule for these sprays and gels are one application every 3 to 4 days on small animals-under 30 pounds. On larger ones-over 30 pounds-one application per week is enough to keep the mouth
healthy and free from tartar build-up. Even with large tartar build-up an application every other day will still have benefits; though, it will just take more time to remove. Several dental diets and treats can also help keep plaque and tartar to a minimum. The diets tend to have larger kibbles to provide abrasive action against the tooth surface when chewed. These kibbles may contain ingredients that help prevent tartar mineralization. Dental treats act as toothbrushes and are often used when one has an animal that fights the brushing.

Probiotics were effective in treating and preventing dental disease as found in a 2009 study published in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association. Probiotics are friendly populations of bacteria that compete with harmful
organisms for places to live and for food. They also help to balance the immune response.

Probiotics will easily colonize in plaque and compete for colonization sites and food with harmful bacteria. They produce anti-bacterial by-products that discourage the colonization of harmful bacteria. They can change the pH of the mouth and the amount of oxygen and they can support the immune system. But, not all strains of probiotics are able to colonize in the mouth. The study found that Lactobacillusspecies of probiotics were much more likely to colonize on the teeth and in plaque than Bificobacterium species. And other studies show that the populations of some species of Lactobacillus were larger in healthy people compared to those with dental disease. Other research found that Lactobacillus species in the mouth are capable of reducing the damaging inflammation that can cause gingivitis and periodontal disease. You can add probiotics to your pet’s food daily. This can be in the form of probiotic-rich foods like fermented vegetables or kefir or you can give them a probiotic supplement (or both). Because it’s so critical to protect from dysbiosis, these should be added daily.

If you are adding a commercial probiotic product, make sure there are more than four strains of bacteria and make sure there are at least 10 billion CFU (colony forming units). Remember, animals already have a trillion bacteria entering their mouths every day so you want as many probiotics as possible to maintain or restore the balance. You will also want to be sure your pet’s food contains plenty of prebiotics, which are insoluble fiber ingredients that feed probiotics. This will prevent the probiotics from just dying off. And finally, dairy-based probiotics may trigger allergies in many animals, especially cats.

Dogs tend to be not all that great at chewing their food, so many of the bugs will just get passed right to the gut. To introduce healthy bacteria into the mouth, you can put a probiotic powder in a small spray bottle with some
filtered water (chlorine will kill the bugs so don’t use unfiltered tap water) and spray it in the dog’s mouth. Then you can put the rest in their food where they’ll help seed the gut too. Note: If you put probiotics in water, make sure that it’s not stored. Make a new batch right at meal time because the bacteria won’t survive long in the water. If brushing their teeth, make sure to spritz their mouths with this mixture afterward to encourage the growth of healthy bacteria populations.

As researchers look into the microbiome as the true source of health and immunity, they are finding that some old treatments just aren’t the best course of treatment as previously thought.

Mitákuye Oyás’in
Jolene Griffiths, ND

The Health Patch 1024 Midwest Blvd., Midwest City, OK Ph: 405-736-1030

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Children’s Oral Health

Many don’t realize how connected oral health is to overall health. Early dental care prevents dental diseases. It is the first line of defense against many common dental issues, such as plaque, gum disease and cavities.

Once children start school parents have less influence over their meals and snacks during the day. Set an example for your children by eating a variety of healthy foods yourself, and by following a consistent oral health care routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing.

Encouraging children to care for their teeth can be an uphill battle. However, it is the parents’ responsibility to encourage better dental care to their children. Obviously, tooth-friendly foods such as fruits, vegetables and nuts are better for teeth than cookies, candy and chips. If you want to improve your children’s eating habits, consider tips to make the process more enjoyable for them:

  • Involve your child in buying and/or preparing healthy food for the table.
  • Have them chop carrots, wash an apple or cut cheese into cubes.
  • Have a pre-prepared healthy snack container in the refrigerator for when they are ready to look for a snack.

Here are 10 tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics top help children keep a healthy smile:

  1. Lead by example. Show them by practicing good oral health yourself.
  2. Choose a dentist that you and your children will like and trust.
  3. Take them to the dentist regularly – usually every six months – for routine cleaning and checkups.
  4. Remind them to brush before they leave for school and before bedtime.
  5. Encourage them to brush during any travel time.
  6. Teach the importance of flossing. It may help prevent gum disease.
  7. Encourage your child to eat breakfast daily. Children who eat a high protein breakfast have a noticeable reduction in cravings for sweets.
  8. If they are going to drink juices, have them use a straw. Doing so reduces their teeth’s exposure to sugar.
  9. Reduce sugar in their diet. Replace sugar snacks with healthy snacks such as fruit, carrots, cheese, crackers and water.
  10. Reward healthy habits. Leave little treats from the “tooth fairy” to reward your child for practicing good oral health.

Poor oral health can profoundly affect a child’s health and well-being. It can cause difficulty in chewing, and may cause them not to eat enough, which would cause them to be lacking in the nutrients required for healthy growth and development.

Your wellness friend, Shirley Golden!

Shirley Golden, Staff ND, The Health Patch – Cultivating Naturopathic Care for Total Health
1024 S. Douglas Blvd, MWC, ph:736-1030, e-mail: jehovah316@netzero.net.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is intended for
educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Oral Health

Much research in alternative health of late has been directed toward the links between the gut and the brain – your microbiome. And the gut begins in the mouth. Good oral health is essential for a healthy biome. So let’s look at some factors to consider when we talk about oral health.

Regular brushing of the teeth, gums and tongue. The mouth is warm, moist, and dark – the perfect breeding ground for bacteria. And that bacteria can grow rapidly in such an environment. Regular brushing to remove that bacteria is essential. Few of us brush enough. You should actually brush after each time you eat – a meal or a snack. If you can’t (for whatever reason) ensure you brush with a good quality toothbrush at least twice each day – in the morning after you rise and at bedtime. Overnight there is nothing going on to disrupt the growth of bacteria in the mouth.

Don’t forget to floss! It’s obvious that brushing removes plaque-forming bacteria from the teeth. And it also gets particles from between the teeth often missed by a brush. But it also “massages” the gums, stimulating blood circulation in the mouth with its immune stimulating factors.

Choose a good toothpaste. Toothpaste is effective for removing tartar and plaque, and it also prevents cavities, periodontal disease and bad breath. It is also the agent for removing stains and discolorations from your smile, and adding ingredients to strengthen your teeth, preventing early breakage and tooth loss. Follow brushing and flossing with a good mouthwash to rinse away the stuff you just brushed off and leave a protective barrier against the bacteria.

And there are certainly things to avoid in your toothpaste:

  • We all know that processed white sugar is one of the worst inflammatory substances we can put in our bodies. It is empty calories that feed yeast, fungus, and bacteria while contributing to obesity, tooth decay and numerous diseases.
  • While many people have been told fluoride is a good thing, it is considered an over-the-counter drug by the FDA who actually warns you to keep it out of the reach of children under six; and tells you not to swallow it!
  • Artificial sweeteners often produce a laxative effect, and some have been linked to serious (and sometimes deadly) diseases. Try natural sweeteners like stevia or xylitol instead. Xylitol has actually been shown to prevent tooth decay. Dentists love it! Most artificial colors have been banned by the FDA for health reasons. If the toothpaste is colored, ensure it used natural colors.
  • Sodium lauryl sulfate is a detergent often used in tooth and hair products that has been shown to produce microscopic tears in the mouth. An often-used thickening agent called carrageenan has been linked to ulcers and gastrointestinal inflammation. And propylene glycol is an oft-used antifreeze used to soften the paste, but has been linked to nervous system, heart and liver damage.

And there are certainly things to avoid in your toothpaste:
We all know that processed white sugar is one of the worst inflammatory substances we can put in our bodies. It is empty calories that feed yeast, fungus, and bacteria while contributing to obesity, tooth decay and numerous diseases.
While many people have been told fluoride is a good thing, it is considered an over-the-counter drug by the FDA who actually warns you to keep it out of the reach of children under six; and tells you not to swallow it!
Artificial sweeteners often produce a laxative effect, and some have been linked to serious (and sometimes deadly) diseases. Try natural sweeteners like stevia or xylitol instead. Xylitol has actually been shown to prevent tooth decay. Dentists love it! Most artificial colors have been banned by the FDA for health reasons. If the toothpaste is colored, ensure it used natural colors.
Sodium lauryl sulfate is a detergent often used in tooth and hair products that has been shown to produce microscopic tears in the mouth. An often-used thickening agent called carrageenan has been linked to ulcers and gastrointestinal inflammation. And propylene glycol is an oft-used antifreeze used to soften the paste, but has been linked to nervous system, heart and liver damage.


We all know that processed white sugar is one of the worst inflammatory substances we can put in our bodies. It is empty calories that feed yeast, fungus, and bacteria while contributing to obesity, tooth decay and numerous diseases.
While many people have been told fluoride is a good thing, it is considered an over-the-counter drug by the FDA who actually warns you to keep it out of the reach of children under six; and tells you not to swallow it!
Artificial sweeteners often produce a laxative effect, and some have been linked to serious (and sometimes deadly) diseases. Try natural sweeteners like stevia or xylitol instead. Xylitol has actually been shown to prevent tooth decay. Dentists love it! Most artificial colors have been banned by the FDA for health reasons. If the toothpaste is colored, ensure it used natural colors.
Sodium lauryl sulfate is a detergent often used in tooth and hair products that has been shown to produce microscopic tears in the mouth. An often-used thickening agent called carrageenan has been linked to ulcers and gastrointestinal inflammation. And propylene glycol is an oft-used antifreeze used to soften the paste, but has been linked to nervous system, heart and liver damage.

Just a word about probiotics. “Pro” means “for”; “biotic” means “life”. And we always want the “good” to win out over the “bad”, right? So if one of the real reasons to brush is to get rid of bad bacteria that cause any number of tooth and mouth disorders, it should make sense to use a good probiotic to fight against the bad stuff that invades our mouths and causes the diseases. I don’t see many toothpastes or mouthwashes with probiotics, but you can certainly use a chewable probiotic at the end of the toothcare routine, and don’t rinse it out of your mouth. They usually taste great and add yet another level of protection to the entryway to your whole digestive system – the mouth!

  • For more information, contact Naturopathic Doctor Randy Lee, owner of The Health Patch at 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, Midwest City, at 405-736-1030 or e-mail pawpaw@TheHealthPatch.com or visit TheHeathPatch.com.

Using Technology for Better Health

We live in a time of great technology, and while it can be very beneficial for our physical, mental, and emotional well-being to “unplug” and put our many electronic devices aside for a time, using technology to gain better understanding of our health needs has never been better.

Here at The Healthpatch, we have many customers that request products that they have recently read or heard about. While the products in question may be of excellent quality and have proven beneficial for many people, the question remains: Is it right for you?

Each person has their own unique biological coherence, making it important to choose and use the correct supplements. We offer health assessment tools called biocommunication scans. One such scan used at The HealthPatch is the Quantum Resonance Magnetic Analyzer. I personally use the Zyto scans with my clients. Both types of scan use a simple and painless process during which a person’s hand is placed on a cradle and then subtle energetic impulses are introduced into the body. Software then records each response. This type of assessment helps remove any communication barriers, making it particularly helpful for children.

A BioScan can also help give insight into personal wellness that may have gone unnoticed. The emotional areas of health are where I see this information particularly helpful.

Regular scans can also help focus on particular areas, track your wellness program, and help save money by eliminating guesswork and utilizing supplements specific to individual needs.

If you are interested in getting your personalized health assessment, contact me at The Health Patch 405-736-1030.

Health and Blessings,
Kimberly Anderson, ND

The Health Patch 1024 S. Douglas Blvd. Midwest City, OK 73130 405-736-1030

What are the Benefits of Full Body Massage?

Massage involves the rubbing and manipulating of muscles, tendons, skin and ligaments. In medical settings, such as clinics and hospitals, chiropractors and many others are doing full body massages. There are around 88 different kinds of massages that can be performed on a person.


It is important that your minerals and vitamins are intact before getting a massage. A person having sciatica on the left side of the body might be low on sodium, whereas a person that is having trouble on the right side of the body might be low on potassium. I have found that runners that have just run a marathon will come in and say they are really hurting after they had just run the marathon. Also, we see a lot of issues with the general public this time of the year due to the hotter weather and people perspiring more. If they don’t replace the sodium when they sweat, then their bodies could start showing signs of low sodium such as cramping or having sciatica problems. I prefer the pink salt known as Himalayan salt. Himalayan Salt has around 84 minerals in it, which can be beneficial for our bodies. You can get it at most stores. https://www.thehealthpatch.com carries it also.

At Integrity health spa we like to call our Swedish massage “Therapeutic Massage”. We critique the massage to the individual. A full body massage offers multiple benefits, both physically and psychologically. Consult a physician if you have any of these medical conditions before getting a massage: cancer, fractures, blood clots, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis or if you are pregnant.

We use essential oils and Magnesium oils and we use Lab certified 100% THC free CBD oils.

At Integrity Health Spa we have Therapists to meet every bodies needs from light touch to extreme deep tissue. We have therapist that are certified in cupping among other things. You can visit our website for additional services @ Integrityhealthspa.com or call 405-455-5454.

Integrity Health Spa
Dr. Pamela Matherly
14453 S.E. 29th Street Suite A/C
Choctaw, Oklahoma 73020
405-455-5454

Intro to Reflexology

Reflexology is a type of massage that involves applying different amounts of pressure to the feet, hands, and ears. It is based on a theory that these body parts are connected to certain organs and body systems. People who practice this technology are called Reflexologists.

There are “main circuits” to every organ, gland, and nerve, and these circuits have pressure points in your hands, feet and other parts of your body. By massaging or “working” these pressure points, you not only stop pain, but you also send a healing force to all parts of the body. When these life lines are closed or clogged, malfunctioning glands and organs will make you ill.

Through reflex massage, you will be able to eliminate the causes and symptoms of sickness and pain from virtually every part of the body. The powerful healing forces of reflexology will bring you renewed vitality and health, and eliminate some illness and pain from your life.

No one should depend completely on reflexology as a “cure all”. However, it is an effective alternative method for treating many symptoms and alleviating some pain.

A person is a structural, chemical and spiritual being, and reflex massage will assist in bringing these three elements into balance.

Reflexology is truly “magic”, but you don’t need a magician to make it work for you. The power is in the hands of the reflexologist. Call The Health Patch and we will refer you to someone to help alleviate pain and illness from your life, and from the lives of those you love.

Your Wellness Friend:
Shirley Golden, Staff ND, The Health Patch – Cultivating Naturopathic Care for Total Health e-mail: jehovah316@netzero.net.

The Health Patch
1024 S. Douglas Blvd, Midwest City, PH:736-1030, http://www.thehealthpatch.com

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

History of Iridology

The effort to understand changes in the eyes and to correlate such changes to alterations in the human body is said to date back to the time of the early Chaldeans (c. 800-539 BC)-even longer ago for domesticated animals. Human iridology research started in 1670 when Dr. Philippus Meyens published Chiromatica medica, describing the eyes of his patients when they became sick or injured. He also noticed changes in the eye that came with healing and was able to link points on the iris to specific parts of the body. By observing the eye, he was eventually able to identify areas in the body in need of support which would show up in the eye long before physical symptoms would manifest.

woman blue eye

“The upper part represents the head, Since the stomach has a close relationship to it, then all diseases originating in the stomach are found in the eyes. The right side of the eyes show as the liver, the right thorax and the blood vessels. The left side of the eyes can show all organs which lie on the left side, therefore the heart, left thorax, spleen and small blood vessels. Conditions of health and disease arising from the heart are found here, especially weakness of the heart or fainting. “The lowest part of the eyes represents the genitalia and also the kidneys and bowels, from which colic, jaundice, stone, diseases of the gall and venereal diseases are to be found. These signs consist of vessels, weals and flecks.” (Quoted from Herget aus Rossdorf.)

Not long after, in 1695, the works of Johann Eltzholtz appeared, and nearly a century later, in 1786, Christian Haertels published a dissertation in Gottingen titled De Oculo et Signo. But the true originator of modern iridology was Dr. Ignatz von Peezely, a Hungarian physician. He first published his ideas in 1893. The story goes that, as a boy, he found an owl with a broken leg. At the time he noticed a prominent black stripe in the iris of one eye of the owl. He nursed the bird back to health and then noticed
that the black line was gone, replaced by ragged white lines. From this single observation Peezely developed the notion of iridology. Peezely’s idea was that the iris maps the rest of the body in some way, and therefore the flecks of color in the iris reflect the state of health of the various body parts. This basic approach is called the homunculus approach. Reflexology, auricular acupuncture, and even chiropractic therapies all follow this same approach.

The modern popularity of iridology, especially in the US, can be traced back to Dr. Bernard Jensen, a chiropractor. He published more than 50 books and received global awards of distinction and recognition for his field of work and service to the global community in iridology and nutrition. Dr. Bernard Jensen stated, “Iridology is the art and science of analyzing the delicate structure of the colored portion of the eye, the iris. The iris reveals the basic constitutional health level of an individual with detailed information pertaining to their physical strengths and weaknesses. The iris can communicate information on all the specific organs of the body and the effects of crises or chronic health challenges to each organ, tissue inflammation levels, and tissue integrity throughout the body. Iridology is a sister-science to nutrition. Each cell, tissue or organ in the body has specific identifiable nutritional needs. When the cell does not receive adequate nutritional values (due to faulty diet, poor absorption and digestion, environmental pollution, high stress levels, etc.) the iris reflects these conditions. Usually these depletions are noticeable in the iris long before they would be discernible through blood work or laboratory analysis, thus making iridology nutritional support strong useful tools for preventive self-care.”

Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ

–  For more information, contact Naturopathic Doctor Randy Lee, owner of The Health Patch at 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, Midwest City, at 405-736-1030 or e-mail pawpaw@TheHealthPatch.com or visit TheHeathPatch.com.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Age-Defying Bodywork

We talk a lot about medicine, supplements, and the latest fad health programs, but you may not be aware of simple “bodyworks” that help us to slow down the aging process. They are simple ways to mark the day-to-day small changes in our bodies and alleviate simple stresses, helping us age more gracefully and with less pain and aggravation. Let’s look at just a few!

Have you ever had anyone look into your eyes and explain that they can tell you about internal stresses in your body? If so, they were probably practicing a science known as iridology. Iridology is a non-invasive, safe and painless diagnostic technique. The irises of your eyes contain a unique pattern in the delicate fibers. This pattern is mapped into areas representing all the organs, glands and functions of the body. By determining exactly where a particular marking lies, an “iridologist” may gain insight into a potential health problem.

Most of us think of the foot as being relatively unimportant – until we stub a toe! At that moment all the energies of the rest of the body are concentrated toward that hurting member. So it is with our feet. Over a century ago, the feet were “charted”. It was noted that the feet were particularly sensitive in spots that directly related to areas of distress in the body. A chart was created that linked areas of the feet to specific portions of the body. Thus “reflexology” was born. In her book on Reflexology, Inge Dougans states, “The art of reflex foot massage must not be confused with basic foot massage or body massage in general. It is a specific pressure technique which works on precise reflex points on the feet, based on the premise that reflex areas on the feet correspond with all body parts. As the feet represent a microcosm of the body, all organs, glands and other body parts are laid out in a similar arrangement on the feet.”

Massage is a popular and well-known bodywork. But many of us think of it only for its relaxation and “feel good” functions. As an age-defying bodywork, it is also a healing art. It reduces the stress on worn muscles, moves lymphatic fluids and other toxins from body systems which contain no pumps, and enhances nutrient rich blood flow into areas that normal day-to-day activities may not complement.

And other age-defying bodyworks are the various magnetic arts and devices such as magnet therapy, and the use of machines like the Body Compass and the Quantum Magnetic Resistance Body Analyzer which use magnetic pulses to measure tissue resistances to help identify weaknesses within the body.

Many herb stores and health food stores have technicians on staff who use these arts and sciences. Fees for the service vary. Call and compare. As with any service, the cost will depend on many variables – how many appointments are included, the length of the appointments, the experience level of the practitioner, etc. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. If you’re looking for an alternative diagnostic tool to aid in determining your overall health, these may be for you.

For more information, contact Naturopathic Doctor Randy Lee, owner of The Health Patch at 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, Midwest City Phone 405-736-1030 or email pawpaw@TheHealthPatch.com Visit our website at TheHealthPatch.com.