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Archive for energy

Simples: American Ginseng

The word “simple” can have a few definitions if one were to look it up in the dictionary. One definition of simple is “easy to understand, deal with, or use.”  In reference to plants, the definition refers to an “herb or plant used for medicinal purposes.”  Obviously, as a natural health practitioner, this definition is my favorite, and I am excited to be bringing a “simple” to Natural Health Dialogue each month.  It is my hope that the information I share is “easy to understand, deal with, and use”. 

This month’s simple is American Ginseng.

Ginseng, derived from the Chinese word jen-shen meaning “the essence of man”, has long been valued in Asian countries and was once so revered that only the emperor was allowed to collect the plant.  Panax ginseng is the Asian or Korean species of ginseng and continues to be one of the most highly prized herbs in the world due to its ability to increase energy, physical stamina, and agility.

American Ginseng or Panax quinquefolius has historically been widespread in the Appalachian or Ozark regions of the U.S.   The temperate climate and shady, rich soil in these mountainous regions provide the unique requirements for the growth of ginseng. However, due to overharvesting and urban growth, the ginseng supply is far less than what it once was.  Fortunately, small doses still provide significant health benefits. 

While American Ginseng is less stimulating or energizing than Korean or Asian Ginseng, it contains similar energizing compounds called ginsenosides and a second group of compounds called panaxanes.  These compounds appear to have even more health benefits that include helping the body cope and adapt to stress, boost the immune system, and regulate blood sugar.  Ginseng also has antioxidants that are important in helping to prevent free radical damage that can cause premature aging.

This month, in our holistic dialogues, Dr. Lee has discussed digestion and how important it is for us to be digesting well.  As we age, digesting and utilizing nutrients well can become difficult.  American Ginseng’s medicinal properties make it greatly beneficial in building up and nourishing the digestive organs as well as helping the body to absorb nutrients more efficiently.

While generally safe and non-toxic there are some that should not use ginseng.  Persons with high blood pressure, acute inflammation, or acute illnesses such as cold or flu should not use ginseng.  High doses can cause insomnia and overstimulation.  However, 100 mg one to two times a day can be an effective long-term tonic for digestion, and the other health benefits listed above.

If you think American Ginseng is for you, we would love to help you here at The Health Patch.

Health and Blessings,

Kimberly Anderson, ND

Randy Lee, BSE, MS, ND, is the Owner of The Health Patch, 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, MWC, 73130. Call us at (405) 736-1030 and visit our website at www.thehealthpatch.com.

The Need for Vitamins and Minerals

This is a little illustration I use every day at the store.  You see, every day, without exception, I have two or three customers who come in with the same question -–”What have you got for energy?”  It seems that in our hectic-paced lives, we find less and less energy to keep us going.  But I find that about four out of every five of my customers report a marked increase in their energy levels after only one week by taking a good, balanced multiple vitamin and mineral supplement.

And, yes, I do have a special one that I like to recommend.  It’s a “Super Supplemental” containing a good blend of all your common (and necessary) vitamins and minerals plus a few of the more important phytonutrients like choline, lycopene, lutein, inositol, and para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA).  Unlike most other products on the market, these ingredients are mainly derived from herbs and other natural sources.  This base of herb and vegetable powders increases absorption and assimilation of the necessary nutrients and provides additional antioxidant and nutritional benefits.

Here’s the illustration.  Consider that every cell in your body is an island (actually, it is).  The “river” in which those islands sit is called interstitial fluid.  From the river, the islands draw nutrients, water, and oxygen.  Then what they do is use these as building materials to produce a substance abbreviated to ATP.  ATP is the form of energy that the body needs to carry out most of its actions and reactions.  This ATP is then placed back into the “river” along with waste byproducts and carbon dioxide.  So, here’s the key: IF THE BODY DOES NOT HAVE SUFFICIENT NUTRIENTS, IT CAN’T PRODUCE ENERGY!

Of course, there are other factors to consider.  Are you getting enough deep, uninterrupted sleep?  Do you set aside times for rest and relaxation away from work and the daily grind?  Are you drinking enough water (take your body weight, divide it by two – that’s how many ounces of water you need to consume in a day)?  Are you overweight?  How much do you exercise (this affects your body’s ability to get enough oxygen to the cells)?

And what happens if the “river” (the interstitial fluid) gets too congested?  Not only is energy flow impeded, but also communication between the cells is inhibited.  With this breakdown of intercellular communication, our tissues begin to break down.  Tissues make up our organs, and our organs constitute body systems.  With these breakdowns come diseases.

Another problem with our hectic lifestyles is the way we eat.  How often do you sit down with your family for a relaxed, unhurried, home-cooked (from nutritional foods), nutritionally well-balanced meal?  Actually, do ANY of those characteristics describe your meals?  Stress affects digestion! So what are the chances that you’re able to get even minimal nutrients from your meals?

Yes, you need to schedule more rest and relaxation.  Yes, you need to reduce stress and get better sleep.  Yes, you need to exercise more, lose some weight, and drink more water.  But doesn’t it just make sense to add the vital nutrition of a well-balanced vitamin and mineral supplement to your daily intake?  It’s the best supplement money you can spend.

Enjoy good health and God’s richest blessings.  Gen.1:29.

–  Randy Lee, ND, Owner, The Health Patch, 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, MWC 73130, phone/fax: 736-1030, e-mail: pawpaw@thehealthpatch.com. Our full staff are now offering affordable private consultations – call to schedule yours!

Back to School

It’s that time of year again.  The kids lament and the moms breathe a sigh of relief.  Summer seems to get shorter and shorter, and ever more full of activities.  So there is little time for rest and then it’s back to the routine of homework and school activities.  What can we do to help our kids get the most from their school experience?  Here are some ideas.

A well-balanced vitamin and mineral supplement is a necessity.  The purpose of every cell in our bodies is to produce energy.  But they must have a balance of proper nutrients as well as adequate water, exercise and rest to accomplish this task.  Since most of us don’t get regular, well-balanced meals, supplements help to meet this need.

Mental alertness is imperative.  Establish a routine early in the school year.  Schedule adequate time for rest, exercise, homework and desired activities.  It takes planning and hard work to fit in everything and balance all the desires of a healthy, well-adjusted young person.  There are some wonderful nutrient supplements to help with mental alertness, too.  They can aid with focus and concentration and they are all natural.  This is especially important if your child has focus and attention challenges.  Talk to the folks in your local herb shop about specific supplements for your child’s special needs.

Also, consider adding an immune system booster to your child’s supplement regimen here at the beginning of the school year.  I’d recommend an echinacea or elderberry supplement.  This is also important as the flu season starts up in another couple of months.  But as we begin to gather in classrooms we mix our ailments with those of our classmates and become susceptible to “who knows what!”

This is also the time of year that we usually see the first round of head lice.  There are some excellent natural shampoos and treatments to get rid of this infestation.  One effective recipe using essential oils is to mix two drops of eucalyptus oil, one drop each of lavender oil and geranium oil, and a teaspoon of any of the common carrier oils.  Then massage this into the hair, leave it for at least a half an hour, and shampoo and rinse.  An excellent rinse is made by combining two drops each of these three oils with half an ounce of vinegar and eight ounces of water.  Make sure you rinse every hair and let it dry naturally.  Repeat this process daily until all the lice and eggs are gone. My grandma used to say that a good head scrubbing with old-fashioned lye soap was a great natural remedy for this, too.

Does your child suffer from acne?  They certainly don’t want to return to school with outbreaks of skin rashes and pimples.  Help them alleviate this problem with a good hygiene regimen.  There are some wonderful herbal programs and some herbal blend supplements to help also.

Finally, remember that the new school year also brings on other conditions for the average student: increased mental stress, increased muscle aches and pains for those involved in school sports, and increased emotional anxiety.  Every student experiences these on different levels.  Watch your students and listen to them.  If a supplement is in order to help them adjust, contact your health food store or herb shop.

This is a wonderful time of the year.  We anticipate fall and the end of summer.  We look forward to school accomplishments and rejoining friends in daily communication.  But it can be a time of added stress.  Be sure to put a positive twist on every adventure.  Enjoy life and make it full. Enjoy good health and God’s richest blessings.  Gen.1:29.

–  Randy Lee, ND, Owner, The Health Patch, 1024 S. Douglas Blvd, MWC 73130, phone/fax: 736-1030, e-mail: pawpaw@thehealthpatch.com.

How to Get Energy